Apr 23, 6 pm - God & Governing: How Texas legislators' religious beliefs guide their lawmaking

The God & Governing project emerged during the 2015 session of the Texas Legislature, as it became evident that discussions of God and faith were underscoring a greater share of political discourse — and disagreement — than in the recent past. The Texas Tribune invited lawmakers to discuss how faith influenced their public policy decisions.

Join us to watch and then discuss.

Free and open to the public

Monday, April 23, 6 pm, basement, Evans Library, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd, Evans, GA

Facebook Event

 Image from Richard Ash on Flickr

Image from Richard Ash on Flickr

The Ten Commandments: An American Historical Document?, Mon, Mar 26, 6 pm

Both the Columbia and Richmond County Courthouses have “Historical Document Displays” which include The Ten Commandments. We’ll listen to a Pew Forum recording of nationally-known lawyers Douglas Laycock and Jay Sekulow make the case for both the legality and illegality of such displays and then have a moderated discussion. Douglas Laycock is the Associate Dean for Research and Alice McKean Young Regents Chair at the University of Texas School of Law. Jay Sekulow is Chief Counsel of the American Center for Law & Justice.

Free and open to the public

Monday, March 26, 6 pm, basement, Evans Library, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd, Evans, GA

Facebook Event

Background information:

 "Historical" Documents Display in Ruffin Courthouse, Richmond County, Georgia, December 2017

"Historical" Documents Display in Ruffin Courthouse, Richmond County, Georgia, December 2017

Talking Points Against Legislation Which Permits Public University-Funded Student Groups to Discriminate

Georgia (HB 471 and SB 339) and South Carolina (H 4440 and SB 221) are both considering legislation which would permit public university-funded student groups to discriminate.

Americans United for Separation of Church and State has produced a document of talking points to help you advocate against the passage of such legislation.

PTN-TPs_StudentClubs.jpg

Oppose SB 375, which permits state-funded adoption & foster-care agencies to discriminate based on religion

SB 375, introduced by Georgia Senator William Ligon, would allow taxpayer-funded adoption or foster care providers to cite religion to justify discriminating against the kids in their care and the parents who want to provide them homes. --- learn more ----

Use this online action tool to send a message to your Georgia senator!

Consider attending the next Georgia Equality lobby day, Thu, March 1, 8:30 AM, in Atlanta.

Here's an example of a letter you might send to your state senator:

As your constituent, I am writing to urge you to oppose SB 375. Religious freedom gives us the right to believe or not as we see fit, but it does not give us the right to harm or discriminate against others. This bill would allow taxpayer-funded adoption and foster care agencies to use their religious beliefs as an excuse to discriminate against the children and families they serve.

SB 375 would allow these agencies to refuse to serve any child or family if doing so is contrary to the agency’s sincerely held religious belief. Under this bill, agencies could cite their religious beliefs to refuse to place a child with a qualified same-sex couple, refuse to place a child with her grandparents because of their religion, or refuse to serve a teen and his family because one of his parents had been divorced.

This bill allows agencies to put their religious beliefs over the best interest of children in need. And that’s just wrong. All children in Georgia deserve a safe and loving home. Please vote NO on SB 375.

Georgia_Adoption2018_r1.png